OUR MISSION STATEMENT

The American ME and CFS Society is dedicated to serving the needs of patients and caregivers through support, advocacy, and education. We seek to channel patient perspectives to government agencies, committees and initiatives, and to unify the ME and CFS community by pursuing the common goals of expanding research, increasing knowledge about treating the disease, and educating health care professionals to help them make a timely diagnosis and alleviate the suffering of patients.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

NIH announces centers for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome research

Press Release: NIH, September 27, 2017. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will award four grants to establish a coordinated scientific research effort on myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). The total cost of the projects for fiscal year 2017 will be over million, with support from multiple NIH Institutes and Centers that are part of the Trans-NIH ME/CFS Working Group.

The grants will support the creation of a consortium made up of three Collaborative Research Centers (CRC) and a Data Management Coordinating Center (DMCC). The CRCs will each conduct independent research but will also collaborate on several projects, forming a network to help advance knowledge on ME/CFS. The data will be managed by the DMCC and will be shared among researchers within the CRCs and more broadly with the research community.

“These important grants will provide a strong foundation for expanding research in ME/CFS, and lead to knowledge about the causes and ways to treat people affected by this mysterious, heartbreaking, and debilitating disease,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.

ME/CFS, which affects more than 1 million Americans, is characterized by profound fatigue that does not improve with rest, and may include problems with thinking and memory, pain and a range of other symptoms that negatively impact everyday life. A key feature of the disease is post-exertional malaise, which is a worsening of symptoms following mental or physical activity. The disease can last for years or decades, with those most severely impacted ending up house- or bed-bound. It is unknown what causes the disease and there are no proven treatments.

“These grants will use innovative technologies and research methods to unravel this devastating disease, which we know so little about,” said Walter Koroshetz, M.D., director of NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and chair of the Trans-NIH ME/CFS Working Group.